Tonia's Roots http://www.toniasroots.net Family History and Genealogy Sat, 25 Oct 2014 17:51:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Researching in First Families of Tennessee Files http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/10/25/researching-first-families-tennessee-files/ http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/10/25/researching-first-families-tennessee-files/#respond Sat, 25 Oct 2014 17:51:32 +0000 http://www.toniasroots.net/?p=11389 A few weeks ago, I spent some time visiting the McClung Collection at the East Tennessee Historical Society in Knoxville. The first thing I looked at was the index to the First Families of Tennessee application files. I’ve written before about using DAR applications as a source, but this was a bit different, since I […]

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First Families of Tennessee filesA few weeks ago, I spent some time visiting the McClung Collection at the East Tennessee Historical Society in Knoxville. The first thing I looked at was the index to the First Families of Tennessee application files. I’ve written before about using DAR applications as a source, but this was a bit different, since I had access to the supporting documentation, rather than only the application form.

While I have several lines who were in Tennessee by 1796 (the criterion for First Families membership), some had not been established as First Families and others’ files did not yield any new information. With one, however, I hit the mother lode.

The file for my fifth-great-grandfather, William Lawson, yielded census information, an 1812 pension file, abstracts from an account book, a court case, and deed abstracts. Lots of deed abstracts.

I made notes regarding sources that I could access online, such as the censuses and the 1812 pension file (Fold 3 is digitizing these files in alphabetical order and is almost up to the Ls – they are free to the public, by the way). I made copies of the other items and have been adding the information to my genealogy database. Here is a selection of what I found:

Thomas Amis Account Book Entries

“Microfilm at McClung Gen. Library
Thomas Amis First Account Book, Big Creek, Hawkins Co. Tn.
William Hinton 1783       also Capt. Samuel Smith 1788
David Hinton 1782                  Samuel Smith, Sr. 1782 note Wm Lawson deed
William Lawson 1785
Reuben Lawson 1786
Peter Lawson 1787                 William Lawson 1794
Isham Reynalds 1786             Isham Reynolds 1794″

My comments:

  • This shows that William Hinton and William Lawson were in Hawkins County by 1783.
  • I don’t know the identity of David Hinton or the Smiths, but they must be relevant to have been included in this abstract.

To do: Obtain original image from microfilm.

Land grant

“Buncombe Co. N. C. June 20, 1796 Land from state of N. C.
David Hinton 100A
William Robert Hinton 100A”

To do: obtain original land grants.

Deed Abstract

“Pittsylvania Co. Va.
January 30, 1779 Book 5 Page 126
William and Sarah Lawson sold to David Ross of Dinwiddie Co.
land N. Side Pigg River.
witness: George Herndon
David Wall
Patrick Morrison”

To do: obtain original deed.

Deed Abstract

“10-123, 9 Mar 1819 (Reg. 4 Apr 1821) Stephen LAWSON of Hawkins Co.,
to Caleb J. Parker of Greene Co., for $1000., all the undivided right
and title of Isham LAWSON, Elijah LAWSON, Stephen LAWSON, William
LAWSON, Elisha LAWSON, and George LAWSON, heirs of Wm. LAWSON, dec’d.
to 200 acres in Hawkins Co., south side of Holston River, adj. James
Breeden, where the widow LAWSON now lives. Wm. Smith, Henry Chesnutt,
wit”

My comments: This deed names several children of William Lawson, including my ancestor Stephen.

To do:

  • obtain original deed
  • look for estate records for William Lawson (I looked in the Tennessee Probate Court files at FamilySearch, but did not find anything).

Promissory Note

“McClung Library
March 25, 1788 Hawkins Co. Tenn. Page 1
I, William Hinton, do promise to pay or cause to be paid to Mr. Joseph
Rogers on order 38 wight of goods-merchantable ginsing the sang? at
2 shillings per lb. or furrs at market price hear to that amount or
bear skins to be paid at or upon the 15th of July 1788 as witness my
hand this 25th day of March 1788.      his
his                                     Wm X Hinton
Test:  William X Lawson                         mark
mark
on reverse side:
Sept. 18th Rec. from Mr. Isham Rannells (Reynalds) 22 lbs. e ozs sang?
at 1/8 per lb. I say rec’d by me
Joseph Rogers
Wm. Hinton
note” 1

To do: obtain copy of original note.

 

This is just a snippet of the information I found in one First Families file. If you have ancestors who were early residents of Tennessee, then I highly recommend a visit to the East Tennessee Historical Society to check out these files. I know that I’ll be going back.

  1. Membership application, Ben Jackson Lamb, no. 0028, First Families of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee.

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Burke’s Garden Historical Marker http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/10/20/burkes-garden-historical-marker/ http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/10/20/burkes-garden-historical-marker/#respond Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:20:30 +0000 http://www.toniasroots.net/?p=11372 Burke’s Garden “Known for its fertility and great natural beauty, the bowl-shaped Burke’s Garden is the highest valley in Virginia.  James Burke discovered it during the 1740s while hunting and settled here about 1754. After four years Burke and his family moved to North Carolina, where he died in 1783. The threat of Indian attack […]

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Burke's Garden Historical Marker

Burke’s Garden

“Known for its fertility and great natural beauty, the bowl-shaped Burke’s Garden is the highest valley in Virginia.  James Burke discovered it during the 1740s while hunting and settled here about 1754. After four years Burke and his family moved to North Carolina, where he died in 1783. The threat of Indian attack and the remoteness of the area discouraged permanent white settlement until the early 19th century.”

James Burke was my seventh great-grandfather.

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Connect. Explore. Refresh. FGS 2015 http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/10/13/connect-explore-refresh-fgs2015/ http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/10/13/connect-explore-refresh-fgs2015/#respond Mon, 13 Oct 2014 12:49:34 +0000 http://www.toniasroots.net/?p=11379 The theme for the FGS 2015 Conference in Salt Lake City is “Connect. Explore. Refresh.” What does that mean to me? Connect The first genealogy conference I attended was FGS 2010 in Knoxville, Tennessee. This is where I found my tribe. People who were not only “interested” in genealogy, but who were serious about it. […]

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FGS 2015 Ambassador BadgeThe theme for the FGS 2015 Conference in Salt Lake City is “Connect. Explore. Refresh.” What does that mean to me?

Connect

The first genealogy conference I attended was FGS 2010 in Knoxville, Tennessee. This is where I found my tribe. People who were not only “interested” in genealogy, but who were serious about it. People who wanted to  learn about methodology, record groups, and, generally, take it to the next level.

I had made quite a few genea-friends through social media and FGS 2010 is where I met many of them in person for the first time. I also met people in classes, in the hallways, at lunches and dinners. And, of course, the bar.

This experience has been repeated at every conference I’ve attended, whether it was SCGS Jamboree, NGS, or subsequent FGS conferences. FGS 2015 is a chance to connect and re-connect with my tribe.

Explore

Since the 2015 conference is in Salt Lake City, that means I will be exploring the Family History Library. My first visit to the library was in 2013 and, even though I spent every available moment there, I still only scratched the surface of the research possibilities. Until you’ve been there, you can’t even imagine how much they have. When people say that it is the largest collection of genealogical materials in the world, they are not kidding. I haven’t started thinking about my research plan yet, but whichever lines I decide to focus on, the FHL will have sources to further my research.

I’m adding a few extra days to my trip before and after the conference, so that I can have dedicated time to explore the Family History Library. Moreover, the library is in walking distance of the conference center and my hotel, so I will squeeze in some library time in between conference sessions, as well.

Refresh

I think others will nod their heads in agreement when I say that sometimes my research gets stale and my interest in genealogy wanes. And that’s okay, because sometimes I need to back off and spend time on other things. Genealogy conferences always (and I really mean always) refresh my interest, give me new perspective, and get me back on track. I’m at the point in my genealogy life-cycle where I spend less time in classes about “how to do” genealogy. I’m attracted to case-study lectures, because they remind me of what I know and how I should be approaching my research. Hearing about others’ challenges and successes refreshes my desire to come home and attack my own research.

Are you going?

If you are thinking about attending FGS 2015, then I hope I’ve given you some reasons that will tip your scale toward yes. Early registration pricing is available through January 23, but I would encourage you to make your decision before the deadline. Hotel rooms in Salt Lake City will fill up quickly and tickets to special events may sell out.

If you are planning to attend, please drop me a comment here or on one my social media channels (links at the top of the page or bottom of this post). And if you see me in Salt Lake City, please say “Hello!”

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Hawkins County, Tennessee 1810 Tax List http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/10/08/hawkins-county-tennessee-1810-tax-list/ http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/10/08/hawkins-county-tennessee-1810-tax-list/#comments Wed, 08 Oct 2014 21:55:55 +0000 http://www.toniasroots.net/?p=11356 Using a Tax List as a Census Substitute I have at least three lines who were in Hawkins County, Tennessee in the early 1800s.  The 1810 census for Tennessee, unfortunately, has been lost, 1 so tax lists serve as a census substitute, at least for males age 21 and over. Transcription Hawkins County Loudebacks Company […]

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Hawkins County TN 1834

Using a Tax List as a Census Substitute

I have at least three lines who were in Hawkins County, Tennessee in the early 1800s.  The 1810 census for Tennessee, unfortunately, has been lost, 1 so tax lists serve as a census substitute, at least for males age 21 and over.

Transcription

Hawkins County

Loudebacks Company 1810

[Numbers refer to 1) land, 2) white polls, 3) black polls. Dashes indicate blanks. Kin are bolded]

Bright, William – 1 –

Barnett, John – 1 –

Beal, George – 1 –

Barrott, Stepen – 1 –

Breaden, James 1000 1 1

Cox, James – 1 –

Coward, James – 1 –

Coward, Joel Jnr – 1 –

Cyster, Daniel 150 – –

Chesnut, Henry – 1 4

Counsel, Cyrus – 1 –

Cox, Tabitha 300 – 2

Dodson, John 350 – –

Day, William – 1 –

Everhart, Jacob 300 1 –

Everhart, Christley – 1 –

Finney, William 160 1 –

Farmer, James – 1 –

George, Harbert 150  1 –

Gollihorn, John – 1 –

Grigsby, John Snr 550 – 6

Henton, William – – 2

Haskins, John – 1 -

Hoard, William Snr 270 1 –

Hoofmaster, Goodlef 200 1 –

Haynes, Thomas – 1 1

—————————-

3420 20 16

 

Jeffres, William – 1 –

Kite, John 180 1 –

Kite, George Snr 320 – 2

Kite, William – 1 –

Kite, George Junr 200 1 –

King Andrew 600 1 –

Kenner, Winder 370 1 –

Lawson, Jacob 290 1 1

Lea, Samuel – 1 –

Lawson, Elijah – 1 -

Loudeback, Isaac 124 1 –

Lawson, Isham 100 1 -

Lawson, Peter 100 1 -

Lawson, William 200 – -

Long, Nicholas – 1 –

Loudeback, Henry 166 1 –

Manes, Daniel 50 1 –

Manes, Bartlett 150 1 –

Maples, William – 1 1

Manes, Seth – 1 –

Manes William – 1 –

Manes, George 50 – –

Manes, Ephraim 150 1 –

Pain, William Junr 250 1 –

Paine, Charles – 1 –

Parton, Charles – 1 –

Pope, Adkin – 1 –

—————————-

3300 24 4

Right, Hance 270 24 4

Rork, John – 1 –

Rork, Michael Snr 290 1 –

Rutherford, John – 1 –

Reynolds, Isham 300 – -

Reynolds, William Snr 180 – –

Reynolds, George – 1 –

Reynolds, Henry – 1 –

Robertson, Hezekiah 400 1 –

Smith, Anthony G. 50 1 –

Smith, John – 1 –

Short, Henry – 1 –

Self, Thomas 200 – –

Smith, Samuel – 1 1

Smith, Joshua – 1 1

Stewart, Elisha – 1 –

Smith, Lauther 44 – –

Smith, James – 1 1

Henry & Lindenberger 397 – –

Smith, Robert 100 – –

Willis, John 100 1 –

———————————-

2331 14 3

3300 24 4

3430 20 16

———————————-

9061 58 23 2

Analysis

  • Tax rates were set at “100 acres of land 12 1/2 cents. . .on each free poll and male servant 12 1/2 cents; on each slave 25 cents.” 3
  • William Henton, no land, no white polls, two black polls. That means William was age 50+, born before 1761, and had two slaves. He was the only William Hinton in Hawkins County. The tax on this would have been 50 cents.
  • John Haskins, no land, one white poll, no black polls. John was between 21 and 50, and therefore born between 1761 and 1789. He was the only John Haskins in Hawkins County. The tax on this would have been 12 1/2 cents.
  • Jacob Lawson, 290 acres, one white poll, one black poll. Jacob was born between 1761 and 1789 and had one slave. He was the only Jacob Lawson in Hawkins County. The tax on this would have been 73 3/4 cents.
  • Elijah Lawson, no land, one white poll, no black polls. Elijah was born between 1761 and 1789. He was the only Elijah Lawson in Hawkins County. The tax on this would have been 12 1/2 cents.
  • Isham Lawson, 100 acres, one white poll, no black polls. Isham was born between 1761 and 1789. He was the only Isham Lawson in Hawkins County. The tax on this would have been 25 cents.
  • Peter Lawson, 100 acres, one white poll, no black polls. Peter was born between 1761 and 1789. He was the only Peter Lawson in Hawkins County in 1810. The tax on this would have been 25 cents.
  • William Lawson, 200 acres no white polls, no black polls. Therefore, he was 50 or older and was born before 1761. He was the only William Lawson in Hawkins County. The tax on this would have been 25 cents.
  • Isham Reynolds (husband of William Hinton’s daughter, Anne), 300 acres, no white polls, no black polls.  Therefore, he was 50 or older and was born before 1761. He was the only Isham Reynolds in Hawkins County. The tax on this would have been 37.5 cents.

Next Steps

Look for Haskins, Hinton, Lawson, and Reynolds surnames on tax lists for other years in Hawkins County.

  1. “1810 Census,” brightsolid, CensusRecords.com, (http://www.censusrecords.com : accessed 7 October 2014).
  2. “Tennessee, Early Tax List Records, 1783-1895,” digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 Oct 2014), p. 126, Loudebacks Company, Hawkins County, 1810; citing Early Tax Lists of Tennessee, microfilm, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee.
  3. “Tennessee, Early Tax List Records,” digital images, Ancestry.com, Hawkins County, 1810, p. 119.

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Planning My FGS 2014 Conference Schedule http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/08/09/planning-fgs-2014-conference-schedule-2/ http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/08/09/planning-fgs-2014-conference-schedule-2/#comments Sat, 09 Aug 2014 12:16:10 +0000 http://www.toniasroots.net/?p=11332 The FGS 2014 Conference in San Antonio is approaching fast. For those unfamiliar, this is the national genealogy conference put on by the Federation of Genealogical Societies. You don’t have to be a member of FGS or a member of any genealogical society to attend; it is open to anyone interested in genealogical research. The […]

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FGS-wordle

The FGS 2014 Conference in San Antonio is approaching fast. For those unfamiliar, this is the national genealogy conference put on by the Federation of Genealogical Societies. You don’t have to be a member of FGS or a member of any genealogical society to attend; it is open to anyone interested in genealogical research. The conference begins on August 27, so I wanted to go ahead and start planning my schedule. I’m doing this in Evernote, so that I will have access to it on my tablet, phone, or laptop. I could use the conference app, but that only lets me make one choice per time slot and I like to have a backup, in case I change my mind at the last minute.

Create a table in Evernote

I start by creating a new note in Evernote with a simple table that has the following headings:

  • Time
  • Choice
  • Speaker
  • Title
  • Description

FGS Schedule Table in Evernote

 

Look for “Must-See” Program Speakers

Next, I look at the list of program speakers to see which of my “must-see” speakers are presenting at this conference.  For me, those speakers are Elizabeth Shown Mills, Tom Jones, Mark Lowe, Judy Russell, Josh Taylor, and Curt Witcher.  I won’t necessarily attend every session they present, but I do want to make sure they get slotted in first.  Looking at speakers, I found 11 sessions that I might want to attend.

  • Elizabeth Shown Mills – Poor? Black? Female? Southern Research Strategies
  • Elizabeth Shown Mills – Finding Origins & Birth Families: Methods that Work
  • Elizabeth Shown Mills – Okay I “Got the Neighbors” – Now What Do I Do With Them?
  • Tom Jones – Inferential Genealogy
  • Tom Jones – Can a Complex Problem be Solved Solely Online?
  • Mark Lowe – Finding Hidden Manuscripts Throughout the Trans-Mississippi South
  • Mark Lowe – Home Guards, Confederate Soldiers, and Galvanized Yankees
  • Mark Lowe – Davy Crockett: Following the Trail from Limestone to Texas
  • Judy Russell – A Family for Isabella: Indirect Evidence from Texas back to Mississippi
  • Judy Russell – That Scoundrel George: Tracking a Black Sheep Texas Ancestor
  • Josh Taylor – Embracing Technology: Tools You Can Use Today to Move Your Society into Virtual Space
  • Josh Taylor – Diving Into Archives: Uncovering ArchiveFinder and ArchiveGrid
  • Curt Witcher – From Bayonets to Bombshells: Often Forgotten Online Sources for Documenting the Military Service of our Families

Check out the conference tracks

Next I look at the tracks offered for the conference.  FGS 2014 has 26 tracks.  The classes I most enjoy tend to fall into these categories:  Methodology, Research Strategies, DNA, Southern Strategies, Writing/Publishing.  Looking at the these tracks, I found four more classes.

  • Methodology – Making Sense of it All: Critical Thinking for Genealogists
  • Technology Genetics/DNA – DNA Case Studies: Analyzing Test Results
  • Technology Genetics/DNA – Using Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and XDNA
  • Writing/Publishing – Social History and Genealogy: Writing Family Narrative

Fill in remaining time slots

Lastly, I go through the schedule day-by-day and look at the options for any time slots I have remaining.

  • Friday 10:15 – After Mustering Out: Researching Civil War Veterans
  • Friday 1:15 – Guardianship: Look Closer at the Documents
  • Saturday 8:30 – Epidemics and Pandemics: Their Impact on our Research
  • Saturday 3:00 – Research Gems: Southern and Western Historical and Sociological Journals
  • Saturday 3:00 – Digital Storytelling for Genealogists
  • Saturday 4:15 – Huguenots: Migration, Emigration, Location, and Contribution

So, that’s a first and second choice for most time slots.  I’ll make final decisions about which sessions to attend when the syllabi are available.  I always make a few last-minute changes and end up attending something that wasn’t even on my list.  Plans are made to be changed.

 

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Some Alexander Death Notices http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/07/26/some-alexander-death-notices/ http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/07/26/some-alexander-death-notices/#respond Sat, 26 Jul 2014 16:26:47 +0000 http://www.toniasroots.net/?p=11283   This is part of an occasional series in which  I process information from a book called Marriage and Death Notices from Extant Asheville, N. C. Newspapers 1840-1870 An Index. I consulted this book  last year at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.  I have lots of people from in and around Asheville, so […]

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Marriage and Death Notices in 1800's Newspapers

This is part of an occasional series in which  I process information from a book called Marriage and Death Notices from Extant Asheville, N. C. Newspapers 1840-1870 An Index. I consulted this book  last year at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.  I have lots of people from in and around Asheville, so I was able to get copies of 24 pages that had surnames of interest to me. Today’s installment begins the “Death Notices” section of the book and focuses on the surname Alexander (all extracts below are from p. 58).

Extracts

“ALEXANDER, Alfred William, only son of A. M. and Susan C. Alexander and brother of Emma and Minnie Alexander, deceased, aged 7 years and 21 days, Oct. 29, 1862 (A. N., Nov. 6, 1862).”1

Comment: “A.N.” refers to the Asheville News, “founded in June, 1849, and published (with periodic interruptions during and after the Civil War) until at least as late as March 28, 1883, the date of its last-known extant copy. In 1868 and 1869 this journal was published as the Asheville News and Western Farmer and the Asheville News and Mountain Farmer, respectively.” 2 Alfred is a 4th-generation descendant of my ancestors, James Alexander and Rhoda Cunningham, so I won’t add him to RootsMagic (I generally limit myself to three generations).  However, I do want to make a note regarding his sisters, Emma and Minnie; Emma is the next entry and Minnie is listed a few entries down on this page.  This family lost three young children in the space of a few weeks.

“ALEXANDER, Emma F., daughter of A. M. and Susan C. Alexander of Buncombe County (born May 29, 1853), Oct. 4 1862 (A. N., Oct. 16, 1862).”

Comment: See previous comment.

“ALEXANDER, James, Sr., aged 88, a veteran of King’s Mountain, June 29, 1844, on Swannanoa, Buncombe County, (H. M., July 5, 1844).”

Comment: “H. M.”refers to the Highland Messenger: Extant and almost entirely complete from June 5, 1840, until some point between August 17, 1848, and September 27, 1849.” 3

This is the James Alexander who married Rhoda Cunningham.

To Do:  look for original image copy of death notice & probate records, if any.

“ALEXANDER, James Washington, aged about 40, June 27, 1859, at his residence on Swannanoa (A. N., June 30, 1859).

Comment:  At this time, he is unknown to me, but since he’s an Alexander who lived on Swannanoa, I bet he’s kinfolk.

To Do:  determine the identity of James Washington Alexander.

“ALEXANDER, John, one of the oldest citizens of Buncombe County, n.d., at his residence on Swannanoa (A. N., Feb. 5, 1857).”

Comment:  This is John C. Alexander, son of James Alexander and Rhoda Cunningham.

To Do:  look for probate records, if any.

“ALEXANDER, Mrs. Leah, wife of William D. Alexander, March 18, 1842, on Swannano, Buncombe County (H. M., March 25, 1842).”

Comment:  This is Leah Burgin, daughter of John Burgin and Elizabeth Mann.

To Do:  look for original image copy of death notice & probate records, if any.

“ALEXANDER, Minnie, daughter of A. M. and Susan C. Alexander of Buncombe County, n.d. (A. N., Oct. 16, 1862).”

Comment: See above comment under Alfred William.

“ALEXANDER, Mrs. Nancy, relict of the late Col. J.M. Alexander, Jan. 14, 1862, at her residence 8 miles north of Asheville (A.N., Jan. 16, 1862).

Comment: This is Nancy Foster, wife of James Mitchell Alexander.

To do: look for probate records.

Clues to be Pursued

Some issues of the Highland Messenger are available online as part of the Digital North Carolina Collection, so seek image copies of the death notices from that publication.

Work Plan

o   James Alexander, Sr.

o   Mrs. Leah Alexander

o   James Alexander, Sr.

o   Mrs. Leah Alexander

o   Mrs. Nancy Alexander

  1. Robert M. Topkins, compiler, Marriage and Death Notices from Extant Asheville, N. C. Newspapers, 1840-1870: an index (Raleigh: North Carolina Genealogical Society, 1977), 58.
  2. Ibid, 1.
  3. Ibid.

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A New Look http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/07/19/a-new-look/ http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/07/19/a-new-look/#respond Sat, 19 Jul 2014 14:08:34 +0000 http://www.toniasroots.net/?p=11271   Visitors the last couple of days will have noticed that Tonia’s Roots has a new look!  Making this change has been in the back of my mind for about a year, and the time finally came a  few weeks ago to move forward. The reasons for the update were mostly performance-based, but the site has […]

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Tonia's Roots-New Look-2014

Visitors the last couple of days will have noticed that Tonia’s Roots has a new look!  Making this change has been in the back of my mind for about a year, and the time finally came a  few weeks ago to move forward.

The reasons for the update were mostly performance-based, but the site has a fresh new look as well.  Tonia’s Roots has been around for almost seven years and has undergone several changes along the way.  The previous style change was implemented three years ago, so it was time for an update.

Framework change

One of the major back-end changes is switching from the Thesis framework to the Genesis framework. The prior theme was built on Thesis 1.x and I designed the theme myself, which involved a big learning curve.  Unfortunately, Thesis development went dark not long after I implemented it.  A couple of years ago they came out with Thesis 2.0, but it was completely new program that I would have had to learn (plus it wasn’t really ready for prime-time when it was launched).

Since I was going to have to learn a new program anyway, I decided to switch to the Genesis framework.  Genesis is produced by StudioPress, which is a Copyblogger company and I trust the folks at Copyblogger to keep it up to date.

Responsive theme

New look - tablet view

In today’s environment, it’s vital to have a responsive theme, which adjusts automatically to whatever screen a reader is using.  As a workaround, I had been using a mobile plug-in and theme, but I really wanted the main theme to be the one seen across all devices.  I found a responsive Genesis child theme that I liked and then tweaked the color-scheme to my preferences.

Discontinued TNG-Wordpress Plug-in

This was a biggie.  I’ve used the plug-in for about five years to integrate my TNG (The Next Generation of Genealogy Sitebuilding) family tree site into WordPress.  The plug-in started out good, but then the developer fell off the face of the earth and stopped supporting it.  Eventually, other people in the TNG community took it over and it works now, but it’s fussy.  It doesn’t respond well to site changes (like upgrades) and it doesn’t play well (or at all) with certain plug-ins and themes.  Moreover, it’s SLOW.

I tried several options to to keep the WordPress and TNG integration, but I finally decided to just let them run side by side.

Family Tree link

There is still a link in the primary navigation menu to take you to the Family Tree, but that portion of the site now has a somewhat different look than the main site (although keeping the same branding and color scheme).

Genealogy-logo-nav

To get back to the main site from the family tree, just click on the Tonia’s Roots logo.

Upgrade to TNG 10.x

During the process, I also upgraded TNG to the current version.  I had been using 8.x, but I was afraid to upgrade due to the aforementioned plug-in fussiness.  The new version is also mobile-responsive, which is big plus.  There is a new vertical ancestry chart, if you prefer that view to the traditional pedigree chart view.  My favorite part is that I was able to turn Google maps back on (it didn’t play well with the plug-in); maps are so essential to genealogy research that I hated not having that information readily available.

I imagine I will be making small tweaks and fixing unforeseen problems for several days.  If you see anything that looks wonky, please let me know.

 

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Death Certificate of Francis Marion Kendrick (1844-1932) http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/06/21/death-certificate-of-francis-marion-kendrick-1844-1932/ http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/06/21/death-certificate-of-francis-marion-kendrick-1844-1932/#respond Sat, 21 Jun 2014 13:25:09 +0000 http://www.toniasroots.net/?p=11157 Francis Marion Kendrick, my 2nd great-grandfather, died 6 November 1932 in Militia District 1011, Murray County, Ga., according to his death certificate. Transcript In the transcription below, boldface indicates the words penned into the pre-printed form: “Certificate of Death, Georgia State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics.” PLACE OF DEATH County                                                            Murray Militia District […]

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Francis Marion Kendrick, my 2nd great-grandfather, died 6 November 1932 in Militia District 1011, Murray County, Ga., according to his death certificate.

Transcript

In the transcription below, boldface indicates the words penned into the pre-printed form:
“Certificate of Death, Georgia State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics.”

  1. PLACE OF DEATH

County                                                            Murray
Militia District (Number and Name)  1011
Registered No.                                            3
City or Town                                                [blank]
No.                                                                   [blank]
St.                                                                     [blank]
2.         FULL NAME                                    Francis Marion Kendrick
Residence (City or Town)                       [blank]
(Street and Number)                                [blank]
(State)                                                             [blank]
3.         SEX                                                      Male
4.         COLOR or RACE                             white
5.         Single, Married, Widowed, Divorced            married
5a. Name of Husband or Wife               Mrs. Barbara Kendrick
6.         DATE OF BIRTH                            [blank]
7.         AGE Years, Months, Days        88 [years]
8.         OCCUPATION                                Farming
9.         BIRTHPLACE                                 Tenn.
10.       NAME OF FATHER                     Thos. Kendrick
11.       BIRTHPLACE OF FATHER       Tenn.
12.       MAIDEN NAME OF MOTHER Mahala Lawson
13.       MOTHER BIRTHPLACE             Tenn.
14.       INFORMANT(Signed)                Mrs. Barbara Kendrick
           (Address)                                          Cisco Ga
15.       Filed                                                  Nov. 30, 1932
            Registrar                                           J. B. Higdon
16.       DATE OF DEATH                          Nov. 6 1932
17.       Physician Attendance               June 1931 to Nov. 5 1932
            Last seen alive                                Nov. 5 1932
            [time of death]                                10 A m
Cause of Death                                Cylitis and Cancer of Duodenum
            Duration                                           [blank]
CONTRIBUTARY                           [blank]
18.       Where disease contracted        [blank]
Did an operation precede death?        No
            Was there an autopsy?                No
            What test confirmed diagnosis?         Constant att.
            (Signed)                                             T. W. Colvard, M. D.
(Address)                                          Conasauga, Tenn
19.       Place of Burial, Cremation or Removal Calvary Cemetery
            Date of Burial                                   Nov. 7, 1932
20.       Undertaker                                     Kenemer Bros.
            Address                                              Chatsworth, Ga. 1 

Analysis:

The source reviewed is an original record.  It is a certified copy of the signed death certificate, which I obtained from the Murray County Probate Court on 31 Dec 2009.

The death date and other medical information were provided by the attending physician and would be considered primary. Alaculsey as the place of death is derived from two pieces of data, both of which are also primary: 1) his place of death is recorded as Militia District 1011, which was the “Alaculsey” district in the 1930 census, just two years earlier. Other documents state that he died in Cisco, but that is likely based on Francis’ and Barbara’s mailing address; their mail would have come through the Cisco post office at this time.

To Do: Obtain land records to ensure that this theory regarding his place of death is accurate. It’s possible that they moved to Cisco; many Alaculsey residents did. 2

Birth information was provided by his wife, Barbara, and is considered secondary. His age was reported as 88, which would mean he was born between December 1843 and November 1844. The 1900 census states that he was born Feb 1844, so the death certificate is consistent. 3  All known sources consistently report Tennessee as his birth place.

Parentage information was provided by Barbara; their names are considered primary information, but their birth places would be secondary. Thomas and Mahala Kindrich lived with Francis Marion and Barbara in 1880 and are named as his parents on the census enumeration, supporting the information on the death certificate. 4

Barbara was the informant on the death certificate. Her address would be primary information.

Lastly, regarding the burial information. . .I’m really not sure who would have provided the information.  Would it have been Barbara or the funeral home?  In either case, it is primary information.

On a side note, I was at Dr. Colvard’s house a couple of weeks ago when I did Murray on My Mind.  Had I known he was Francis Marion’s physician, I would have taken a picture of the house.

 

  1. Murray County, Georgia, death certificate no. 3 (1932), Francis Marion Kendrick, Murray County Probate Court’s Office, Chatsworth.
  2. Murray County History Committee, Murray County Heritage (Fernandina Beach, Florida: Wolfe Publishing, 1987), 309.
  3. 1900 U.S. Census, Murray County, Georgia, population schedule, Alaculsa District No. 1011, enumeration district (ED) 70, sheet 12-A (penned), p. 55 (stamped), dwelling 206, family 210, France M. Kindrick household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 Aug 2007); citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 213.
  4. 1880 U. S. census, Murray County, Georgia, population schedule, Alaculsey (G. M. 1011), Enumeration District (ED) 155, p. 9 (penned) p. 472 (stamped), dwelling 75, family 78, Francis Kindrich household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 30 Dec 2007), citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 159.

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Columbus Library Research Trip – 12 Jun 2014 http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/06/18/columbus-library-research-trip-12-jun-2014/ http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/06/18/columbus-library-research-trip-12-jun-2014/#respond Wed, 18 Jun 2014 23:12:42 +0000 http://www.toniasroots.net/?p=11194 I had a business trip to Columbus, Georgia last week and Columbus has a great genealogy section in their library, so I decided to do a little after-work research.  I knew that I would only have a couple of hours at the library, which made it essential that I go in with a plan. I […]

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Columbus-libraryI had a business trip to Columbus, Georgia last week and Columbus has a great genealogy section in their library, so I decided to do a little after-work research.  I knew that I would only have a couple of hours at the library, which made it essential that I go in with a plan.

I reviewed their online catalog and decided to focus on books with newspaper clippings and will abstracts.  I made a list of books in these categories that I wanted to review and then added the names of specific people and general surnames for each locality.  I made this list in Google Docs, so that I could access in on my tablet and make notes on what I found in real time.

I was able to review several books and got quite a bit of good information.  This is how my research report for this visit looks:

  • Findings are bulleted and in italics
    • Comments are indented and underlined

Newspaper Records:

Wilkes County (Washington), Georgia, newspaper abstracts 1810-1815 by Poss, Faye Stone.

1) Thomas Mackie.  2) Also John Mackie, Samuel Mackie, David McClesky

  • pp. 100-101, Thomas Mackey – entry dated 7 Mar 1812 regarding a Sheriff’s sale.  
    • Who is this?  My Thomas died in 1796.  Could this be a son or a nephew?
  • p. 235-236, Littleton Mackie – entry dated Oct 1815.  He is on a list of letters left at the post office.
    • Who is he?  The name Littleton intrigues me, because of Littleton Lytle.
  • There are two entries in the index for a John “McCluskey” or “McClusky,” but no McClesky

Wilkes county (Washington), Georgia, newspaper abstracts 1802, 1805-1809 : The Monitor and Impartial Observer 1802; Monitor 1805-1809  – GEN 929.3 G3wil Pos

  • p. 14, John McKey – entry regarding Administrator’s sale for estate.  
    • This is likely Mary Ann Mackie’s brother.  dated 10 Aug 1805
  • p. 131, Samuel McKie – entry dated 9 May 1807.  Land adjoining his was was to be sold for back taxes.  
    • This may also be Mary Ann’s brother.
  • p. 63, John McKee – another entry regarding administrator’s sale, dated 3 May 1806
  • p. 266, William McKee – entry dated 23 Sep 1809 regarding establishing a singing school.  
    • They may be Mary Ann’s brother
  • Index entries for Mark McCluskey and John McClusky, but nothing for David under any spelling variation

Milledgeville, Georgia, newspaper clippings (Southern recorder) by Evans, Tad. GEN 929.3 G3bal Eva 1 – Volume XII, 1866-1872 and (Misc Papers 1825-1841)

1) James Butler or Harvey D. Ward

  • There are several entries for James and J. B. Butlers, but they are clearly not my James.
    • This set of books needs to be reviewed in more detail.  It has entries for many GA counties (presumably because Milledgeville was the state capitol).  Also the Baldwin County, Georgia Newspaper Clippings (Union Recorder) set of books.

Deaths, murders and lynchings : abstracted from Lumpkin County, Georgia, newspapers / Jimmy E. Anderson. GEN 929.3 G3lu And 1

1) Forrester, Carnes, Nancy (Chapman) Patterson. 2) Levi Mote, Mary (Qualls) Mote, other Pattersons

    • This is another book that needs to be looked at in detail as it includes items picked up from other counties, such as Gilmer, Fannin, etc.
  • 2 entries for Forrester, but neither are mine
  • p. 62, entry for a Benj. Forrest who died 28 Nov 1878 in Stone Mountain
  • No entries for Carnes, Cearns, or Kerns
  • No entries for Patterson
  • Various Chapman entries, but none seem applicable
  • p. 304, death notice for Levi Mote, died 1900
  • 1 Quarles entry, but no first name given
  • Various Brooksher and Brookshire entries, but none seem applicable
  • Various Butler entries, none likely
  • One Cunningham, but no first name.
  • Looked at various other surnames: Garrett, Ward, Whitener, Weidner.  No hits.

Will Abstracts:

Elbert County, Georgia, abstracts of wills, 1791-1919 / Fred W. McRee, Jr. GEN 929.3 G3el McR

1) Rosannah (McIntyre) Mackie, Susannah (Patton) Hemphill.  2) Surnames: Hemphill, Mackie, McClesky

  • p. 10, abstract # 18, will for Thomas Mackie, found in WB B, p. 19
  • Nothing for Mackey, McKee, McKie, etc.
  • Nothing for McEntire, McIntyre
  • The only Hemphill is referring back to Thomas Mackie’s will
  • Entry for a Samuel “Patten,” but he doesn’t look like a connection
  • Nothing for McClesky, McClusky, McLesky, etc.

Burke County, North Carolina, surviving will and probate abstracts, 1777–1910 by Philbeck, Miles S. GEN 929.3 N8bur Phi

1) Captain Thomas Lytle.  2) Burgin, Dellinger, Hemphill, Lytle, Mann, McEntire, Mull, Pattillo, Patton, Stroud, Whitener, Dysart, Powell

  • No entries for Lytle or Little
  • abstract #308.  Entry for Robert Logan, proved by Alny Burgin, witness.
    • Robert Logan was one of the witnesses to Captain Thomas Hemphill’s will.
  • abstract # 324. Entry for John McDowell, witnessed by Robt. Logan, J. Burgin, Ben Burgin
  • abstract # 85.  Entry for Benjamin Burgin.
    • This is Pioneer Ben.
  • abstract # 165.  Entry for William England.  Benjamin Burgin, exec and Benjamin Mann, witness
  • abstract # 36. Entry for Benoni Banning.  Presented for probate by Jesse Burgin
  • abstract # 159. Entry for Sarah Edmiston. Exec Jess Burgin, Jr. Witness Rosamond Burgin
  • There are several Dellinger entries, but they are all late 1800s and none of the names look familiar.  Could be distantly related.  Not making copies.
  • abstract # 234. Entry for Jacob Harshaw.  Names daughter Mary Ann Hemphill and children of T. L. Hemphill
    • T. L. is the son of Andrew Hemphill and Catherine McDonald.
  • abstract # 249. Entry for James Hemphill, presented for probate by Robert Hemphill in April 1815.
    • Not sure who this is.
  • a Laura Hemphill witnessed a will for Ann Pearson  Not sure who they are.  No copy made.
  • abstract # 505. Entry for Michael Spainhour.  Names a Martha E. Hemphill
    • Apparently, this Martha married a LaFayette Hemphill.  Not sure who he is.  On a side note, found book of old Southern Bible records on Google Books.
  • abstracts #349 and #350.  entries for John & Samuel Mackey, dated 1820 and 1831, respectively.  John’s was proved by Robert Logan.
  • abstract #333, entry for James McEntire, dated Jul 1820. Names son William and widow Nancy.
  • abstract #334, entry for James McEntire, presented Jul 1830
  • abstract #335, entry for Thomas McEntire, Sr.  Thomas L. McEntire and Andrew Hemphill executors.
    • Is this Thomas Young Hemphill McEntire?
  • abstract #95, entry for John Carson.  Names a Rebecca McEntire.  Dated Oct 8142
    • Who is she?
  • abstract #535, entry for John Vanhorn, dated 1840.  Names several Mull daughters (one who married a Peter Mull) and grandchildren.  
  • There are lots of other Mull entries, but the given names do not look familiar and the dates are too late.
  • No entries for Patillo, Petillo, Potillo, etc.
  • abstract #369, entry for Babel Moore, dated 1873.  Names daughter Charity Patton, decd, & her children.
  • abstracts #410 – 416, several Pattons in a row.
    • Hopefully, this will help me sort out the Pattons.
  • abstract # 172, entry for Arthur Erwin, dated 1819.  Names daughter Polly Patton & her children
  • abstract # 539, entry for Martha Walton, dated 1865.  Names decd. daughter Louisa Patton.
  • abstract # 512, entry for Peter Stroud, dated Jul 1827.
    • This is likely the Peter who married Naomi and Rebecca.
  • No entries for Weidner or Whitener.  Two Whitner entries as witness.  Did not copy.
  • abstract # 446, entry for Elias Powell, dated 1832.
    • This is the Elias who married Anna Barbara Albright.
  • abstracts # 156 & 157. entries for Samuel & William Dysart.
    • Not sure who they are at this point.
  • abstract # 513, entry for John Sudderth.  Names decd. daughter Mary Powell.
    • Mary was the wife of Rev. John Bowman Powell, grandson of Elias Powell & Anna Barbara Albright

Burke County, North Carolina, Records 1755-1821 (Including Wills Index 1784-1900), Volume IV by Edith Warren Huggins

  • p. 46, chapter on court minutes, entry for John Petillo, dec’d.  Names heirs, including “Susannah Petillo (now Lytle)”
    • This book is available at the Calhoun library.  It has so much information that it needs much more time than I have today.

Abstracts of Book A, wills, guardians, administrations, Lumpkin County, Georgia, 1833-1852 – GEN 929.3 G3lu Wri

1) Forrester, Carnes, Nancy (Chapman) Patterson. 2) Levi Mote, Mary (Qualls) Mote, other Pattersons

  • There is a Berry Forrester mentioned.  No idea who he is.  No copy made
  • No entries for Carnes, Kerns, etc.
  • No entries for Patterson
  • No entries for Mote
  • No entries for Qualls, Quarles

Work Plan for Next Visit

Surry County, North Carolina, will abstracts, Vols. 1-3, 1771-1827. by Linn, Jo White.  – GEN 929.3 N8 Lin

1) James Burk. 2) Debord, Tucker, Burk, Brookshire

Rutherford County, North Carolina, abstracts will book A, 1779-1791. by Davis, Caroline Heath.  GEN 929.3 N8ru Dav

Baxter, Ward, Searcy

Wilkes County, N.C., will abstracts, books one & two, 1778-1811 by Absher, W. O., Mrs., 1915- GEN 929.3 N8wi Abs –

1) Mary Ann (Marlow) Brookshire 2) Brookshire, Debord, Powell, Tilley, Marlow, Burk

Caldwell County, North Carolina, will abstracts, 1841–1910 by Philbeck, Miles S. GEN 929.3 N8ca Phi –

1) Ann Barbara (Albright)Powell,  2)Powell, Albright, Whitener

Rowan County, North Carolina will abstracts GEN 929.3 N8row Lin 1

1) James Hemphill, William Brookshire, John Mann, Johannes Christopher Mull.  2) Alexander, Brookshire, Burgin, Mann, Potillo, Stroud, Hemphill, Mull, Debord, Davidson, Patton, Burk, Weidner, Albright, Cunningham, Summerville

Anson County, North Carolina : abstracts of early records by McBee, May Wilson. GEN 929.3 N8an McB

Lytle, Patton, Whitener, Poffh, Dellinger, Hemphill

York County, South Carolina will abstracts : 1787-1862 (1770-1862)  – by Holcomb, Brent. GEN 929.3 S7y Hol

Quarles, Cunningham

Abstracts of Will Book A, 15 March 1824–6 July 1849 Franklin County, Georgia  – by Hageness, MariLee Beatty GEN 929.3 G3fr Wil

Mackie

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Jim Butler’s Military Service http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/06/14/jim-butlers-military-service/ http://www.toniasroots.net/2014/06/14/jim-butlers-military-service/#comments Sat, 14 Jun 2014 12:26:04 +0000 http://www.toniasroots.net/?p=11142 James B. Butler, my great-grandfather, enlisted in the United States Army on 10 November 1901 in Ellijay, Georgia for a period of three years. At the time of his enlistment, he was a 21-year-old farmer, described as being  6 feet tall, with blue eyes, light brown hair, and a ruddy complexion. 1 Two months later, […]

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James B. Butler, my great-grandfather, enlisted in the United States Army on 10 November 1901 in Ellijay, Georgia for a period of three years. At the time of his enlistment, he was a 21-year-old farmer, described as being  6 feet tall, with blue eyes, light brown hair, and a ruddy complexion. 1

Two months later, he arrived in Manila on the U.S.A.T Hancock. 2  He was stationed in Calbayog, Samar Province, Philippines, as part of  Co. K, 9th Infantry 3, during the Philippine-American War.  On 10 May 1902, he transferred to Co. I, 1st Infantry, in Tacloban on the island of Leyte. He left the Philippines on 4 April 1904.

philippines-map

Jim was honorably discharged with the rank of Corporal on 9 November 1904 at Fort Porter, New York.  He was in good physical condition, having received no wounds in service. 4

  1. “U.S. Army, Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914,” digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 Jun 2010), vol. “1901 May – 1902, A-K,” p. 122, entry no. 3241, James B. Butler, 9th U.S. Inf., enlisted 10 Nov. 1901, Georgia; citing Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914, National Archives microfilm publication M233.
  2. James B. Butler U. S. Army Discharge Paper 4 Nov 1904; Kendrick Family Papers, 1904—, privately held by Tonia Kendrick, {ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,} Chatsworth, Georgia. This original signed document was passed from Butler’s daughter V. B. Kendrick to the current owner in 2014.
  3. Compiled service record, James B. Butler, Pvt., Co. K, 9th Inf.; Carded Records, Volunteer Organizations, Spanish American War/Philippine Insurrection; Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780s–1917, Record Group 94; National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  4. James B. Butler U. S. Army Discharge Paper.

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