Probate Records

Which Edmund Tilley?

16 December 2013 Analysis

The father of my 5th great-grandfather Stephen Tilley was Edmund Tilley.  I had very little information on Edmund and what I did have was sketchily sourced.  I recently acquired some more information on this line and it had a completely different death date and place for Edmund.  As in 35 years different.  Dates in genealogy […]

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Orphans of J. Y. Hemphill

4 September 2013 Analysis

Earlier this year, I mentioned finding a guardianship bond for the children of my 2nd great-grandfather, J. Y. Hemphill.  Here’s what I learned. Transcript: Georgia  Murray County. Know all men by these presents: That we Mary E. Hemphill principal and T. M. Hemphill & J. D. McEntire sureties are bound  unto W H Ramsey Ordinary of said […]

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Murray County Administrators & Guardian Bonds – a Research Plan

27 March 2013 Research

Several months ago, I discovered that the (non-indexed) images of Georgia Probate records had been added to FamilySearch.  I started searching through the Administration & Guardian Bonds for Murray County and immediately hit pay dirt with a guardianship bond for my 3rd great-grandfather, Andrew B. Baxter.  I also found a guardianship bond for the children […]

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Andrew Baxter Guardianship Bond

30 September 2012 Analysis

Yesterday morning I noticed that FamilySearch had added a new collection to its Georgia Records:  Georgia, Probate Records, 1742-1975. With the impending closure of the Georgia Archives, I’m glad to see more of our state’s records coming online. This collection contains over 2 million records. It’s browsable only at this time, but it is organized […]

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Captain Thomas Hemphill’s Will – The Last Page

23 April 2012 Evidence

This is the last installment in a series of nine posts in which I transcribe the will of my Revolutionary War ancestor, Captain Thomas Hemphill. In the first post, we learned that Captain Thomas’ will was contested by two of his children and a son-in-law, and that the date usually seen for his death may […]

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Captain Thomas Hemphill’s Will – page 8

19 March 2012 Evidence

This is the eighth installment in a series of nine posts in which I transcribe the will of my Revolutionary War ancestor, Captain Thomas Hemphill. In the first post, we learned that Captain Thomas’ will was contested by two of his children and a son-in-law, and that the date usually seen for his death may […]

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Captain Thomas Hemphill’s Will – page 7

12 March 2012 Analysis

This is the seventh installment in a series of nine posts in which I transcribe the will of my Revolutionary War ancestor, Captain Thomas Hemphill. In the first post, we learned that Captain Thomas’ will was contested by two of his children and a son-in-law, and that the date usually seen for his death may […]

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Captain Thomas Hemphill’s Will – page 6

5 March 2012 Analysis

This is the sixth installment in a series of nine posts in which I transcribe the will of my Revolutionary War ancestor, Captain Thomas Hemphill. In the first post, we learned that Captain Thomas’ will was contested by two of his children and a son-in-law, and that the date usually seen for his death may […]

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Captain Thomas Hemphill’s Will – page 5

27 February 2012 Analysis

This is the fifth installment in a series of nine posts in which I transcribe the will of my Revolutionary War ancestor, Captain Thomas Hemphill. In the first post, we learned that Captain Thomas’ will was contested by two of his children and a son-in-law, and that the date usually seen for his death may […]

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Captain Thomas Hemphill’s Will – page 4

20 February 2012 Analysis

This is the fourth installment in a series of nine posts in which I transcribe the will of my Revolutionary War ancestor, Captain Thomas Hemphill.  In the first post, we learned that Captain Thomas’ will was contested by two of his children and a son-in-law, and that the date usually seen for his death may […]

Read the full article →